B M
Bridgwater Blake Museum
Bridgwater’s Heritage
From Stone Age to Modern Age, there’s something for everyone.
Privacy: First-hand Cookies are neither requested nor generated by this site. Forum complies with GDPR
Copyright © Bridgwater Blake Museum 2020
The building of the stone bridge over the River Parrett at Bridgwater was begun in the time of King John, by William Brewere, and finished in the reign of Edward I, by Sir Thomas Trivett. When Bridgwater was stormed and taken by Cromwell’s forces in July, 1645, this bridge obstructed the successful advance of the storming party for two or three days. There was at that time a gate at the bridge, where the royalists made barricades, and drew up a drawbridge.
The passage of barges up the river was obstructed and often occasioned much damage at high tide, so in 1795 it was taken down, and a Coalbrookdale - made cast iron arch bridge erected in its place. The Coalbrookdale-made iron bridge of 1795 'Bridgewater Bridge — ' This structure, which is principally composed of cast-iron brought in piecesfrom Coalbrook-Dale, Shropshire, by water carriage, is now pretty well completed: it consists of one arch, the span of which 75 feet; the road-way is 24 feet wide in the clear, including two foot paveways; it is lighted with six lamps. The expense of erecting the bridge is about £4000 which was collected by additional toll on all the turnpikes leading to the town. The former bridge had stood 500 years, and was built by an ancient Lord of Bridgewater; the piers are not yet quite taken away.The iron- bridge is one of the handsomest in the kingdom.' A newspaper report of 1798
The bridge was replaced by the present Town Bridge in 1883. It was designed by Mr. R. C. Else, C.E., of Bridgwater, with a 75 feet span and 36 feet wide in the clear, having two footpaths each six feet wide. It consists of seven wrought-iron arched ribs drawn together by transverse and diagonal braces, and rests upon, and is built into, masonry abutments. The paneling consists of ornamental cast-iron railings, fitting into Ham Hill masonry piers each end, and surmounted with cast-iron lamp brackets carrying Sugg's patent lanterns and burners. The road is practically level, only rising six inches in the centre of the bridge, and the new bridge is 12 feet wider than the old one. The contractor was Mr George Moss, of Liverpool, the cost amounting to £3,214 11s 4d, the iron work of the old bridge was disposed of to the contractor for £175, and he provided a wooden temporary bridge for the sum of £150
Bridges
Contact: Blake Museum 5 Blake Street Bridgwater, Somerset TA6 3NB Tel: 01278 456127 Email here
Bridgwater’s Heritage
Bridgwater Blake Museum
B M
The building of the stone bridge over the River Parrett at Bridgwater was begun in the time of King John, by William Brewere, and finished in the reiagn of Edward I, by Sir Thomas Trivett. When Bridgwater was stormed and taken by Cromwell’s forces in July, 1645, this bridge obstructed the successful advance of the storming party for two or three days. There was at that time a gate at the bridge, where the royalists made barricades, and drew up a drawbridge.
The passage of barges up the river was obstructed and often occasioned much damage at high tide, so in 1795 it was taken down, and a Coalbrookdale - made cast iron arch bridge erected in its place. The Coalbrookdale-made iron bridge of 1795 'Bridgewater Bridge — ' This structure, which is principally composed of cast- iron brought in piecesfrom Coalbrook-Dale, Shropshire, by watercarriage, is now pretty well completed: it consists ofone arch, the span of which 75 feet; the road-way is 24 feet wide in the clear, including two foot paveways;it is lighted with six lamps. The expense oferecting the bridge is about £4000 which wascollected by additional toll on all the turnpikesleading to the town. The former bridge had stood500 years, and was built by an ancient Lord ofBridgewater; the piers are not yet quite taken away.The iron-bridge is one of the handsomest in the kingdom.' A newspaper report of 1798
The bridge was replaced by the present Town Bridge in 1883. It was designed by Mr. R. C. Else, C.E., of Bridgwater, with a 75 feet span and 36 feet wide in the clear, having two footpaths each six feet wide. It consists of seven wrought-iron arched ribs drawn together by transverse and diagonal braces, and rests upon, and is built into, masonry abutments. The panelling consists of ornamental cast-iron railings, fitting into Ham Hill masonry piers each end, and surmounted with cast-iron lamp brackets carrying Sugg's patent lanterns and burners. The road is practically level, only rising six inches in the centre of the bridge, and the new bridge is 12 feet wider than the old one. The contractor was Mr George Moss, of Liverpool, the cost amounting to £3,214 11s 4d, the iron work of the old bridge was disposed of to the contractor for £175, and he provided a wooden temporary bridge for the sum of £150
The Port of Bridgwater
Privacy: First-hand Cookies are neither requested nor generated by this site. Foum complies with GDPR.
Copyright © Bridgwater Blake Museum 2020
Contact: Tel:01278456127. Email here